Category: CNC

Banggood A3 Laser Post for Fusion 360 Laser CAM

Fusion 360 is an awesome CAD/CAM package from Autodesk.  The licensing is reasonable,  the support is good, the CAD/CAM is top notch and it runs on both macOS and Windows 10.  Recently I acquired a Banggood A3 2.5W Laser Engraver and decided, since I had a good tool chain for cutting on my ShapeOKO I may as well carry that over to my Laser.  I started with GRBL 1.1d (edge) release which was just just came out and built it using the PlatformIO IDE.  I did this on my Mac and uploaded the resultant hex file using Xloader on my PC that’s connected to the laser.  The compiled hex I used for my Atmega328 Nano that was installed on my laser is below.  Please note if you were not running GRBL 0.9 on your laser prior you should remove the nano and set the jumper to 0.9 on the controller board.  Note if you are using a Smoothie board you can just follow along with the tool path and gcode generation portion that follows and use the Smoothie post that is already included.  The GRBL post that’s included does not support the new waterjet/laser features.

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Makerbot Thing-O-Matic Cura Profile

I lieu of the nearly constant inexpliciple crashes I have been encountering with Slic3r I decided to try and get Cura working with my now (Ancient) Makerbot Thing-O-Matic running Sailfish. It wasn’t really terribly hard to get into Cura after the legwork with Slic3r was done. I just needed to slightly correct the Gcode coming out of cure before it was fed into the GPX post-processor to generate X3G for the printer.

My basic slicing profile can be found here: Cura Thing-O-Matic Profile

In addition to this profile I made a slight tweak to the previous post-processor script I had written for Slic3r. This removes the CURA_PROFILE_STRING from the end of the code since it causes a buffer overflow in gpx. In addition it maps over the bed temperature and tool temperature settings over to compatible settings for my Thing-O-Matic. Note: This is for running Cura/GPX on a Mac.

#!/bin/bash -f

pp_path=`dirname "$0"`
export pp_path

egrep -v "M127|M126|;CURA_PROFILE_STRING" "$1" | sed 's/M109 S/M104 T0 S/g' | sed 's/M190 /M109 /g' > "$1.tmp"
# rm $1
mv "$1" "$1.orig"
mv "$1.tmp" "$1"

"$pp_path/gpx" "$1"

exit 0

It’s amazing this thing is still running strong after 5 years of abuse.

Danby Kegerator two draught faucet upgrade

Draught Tower Upgrade

I have a Danby DKC14SLDB 5.2 cubic Foot Single Draught Kegerator  I purchased several years ago.  Several times a year I find myself with two pony kegs of homebrew I want on tap.  Only having a single draught faucet was really cramping my style.  I decided instead of purchasing a whole new tower with two faucets ($90)  or an adapter ($70), which would have required the additional faucet anyhow, I would make it work on the cheap.  I set out by purchasing the following  items form Beveragefactory.com (note I have been home brewing for a long time and as such I have some old Coca-Cola pin-lock kegs that I normally use – please purchase whatever keg coupling is appropriate for your application): Read more

Autodesk Fusion 360 CAM Post-processor for ShapeOKO

I recently started playing around with Autodesk’s Fusion 360 3D modeling and CAM software.  I managed to fumble my way through making some quick designs and setting up a simple cam job to make a tool holder.  Designing the part was quick and so was setting up the CAM operation.  However when exporting the G-Code through the grbl post-processor I discovered the G-code was using G28 (return to home) which isn’t supported in a stock ShapeOKO 2.  Limit switches would need to be installed for this to work and for it to be turned on in grbl.  The default startup G-Code using the grbl post processor looks like this:

%
(1)
(T4  D=6.35 CR=0 - ZMIN=-19.525 - flat end mill)
G90 G94
G17
G21
G28 G91 Z0
G90

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ShapeOKO 2 Grbl 0.9G Upgrade

I was cutting on my ShapeOKO 2 last weekend and having major issues with missing steps on the Z.  During fast retracts the Z would just hum resulting in passes where the tool wouldn’t clear the work resulting in more or less catastrophic failure.  Either the work piece was damaged or the bit from trying to be forced through way more material it should be before I hit the e-stop.  After some research I came to the conclusion that the stepping was the culprit.  The steppers are configured correctly, wired correctly and moving as freely as possible but the controller would step at a rate that was causing issues on the Z.

After a little research I found that there was an update to GRBL version 0.9G that in addition to having a better acceleration planner the maximum feed rates could be configured per-axis.  This is a pretty big deal because in 0.8C all the axis are limited by your slowest axis – which is the Z.  Because of this cutting speeds are severely limited on the axis that one spends most of the time cutting on.

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Engraved Walnut Cantilever Wine Bottle Holder

cantilever1

I made this nice cantilever wine bottle holder out of 3/4″ walnut and engraved it for my friends wedding.  I ripped off a 2 1/2″ piece of black walnut  from a piece of walnut I had purchased from The Woodery in Fitchburg.  This isn’t an advertisement, but I do take notice when someone has  excellent customer service and a fantastic selection of hardwoods, softwoods and exotics.  I could spend all day in there picking out lumber.
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Project – Electric Spinning Wheel

I designed and built this electric spinning wheel for my wife earlier in the year.  The spinner was mocked up in OpenScad (See e-spinner.scad for the cad design and assembly).  This was built out of Maple, Aluminum tube, Nylon bushings and tube and some miscellaneous hardware. The e-spinner is powered by a Singer Style sewing machine motor hooked up to a foot pedal and lamp dimmer for speed control. The aluminum and nylon tube was cut on my Atlas 10″ lathe. The bobbin ends were cut on my Shapeoko CNC Router.

You can see the spinner in action here with my wife spinning imported wool she carded herself:

Bill of Materials (all wood is maple or other suitable hard wood):

  • 1″x3″x7″ (x2) wood for supports
  • 1 Nylon Bushing (1″ O.D. 3/4″ I.D. 3/4″ thick
  • 3/8″ x 8″ (x2) Dowel
  • 1″x1″x6″ wood for flyer arm
  • 1″x3″x9 3/8″ (x2) wood for frame
  • Nylon Tube (1/2″ I.D. 3/4″ O.D.) 6″
  • Aluminium Tube (1/2″ O.D. 1/16″ Thick Wall)
  • 1/4″ x 3″ x 3″ wood for bobbin ends
  • Wood Glue
  • 1 1/2″ Brass wood screws for assembly (x6)
  • Singer Style sewing machine motor
  • Silicone Hair Ties (for belts)

Ayer Makerspace Meeting

Met some great people last night at the Ayer Makerspace meeting.  Faisal Mohammed led the meeting along with the Ayer Board of Economic Development.  A common vision for the makespace was discussed along with some proposals for where it might be located and what the people who attended planned to get out of it.  There I met some other makers, tinkerers and inventors like Craig Farnsworth who runs Farns Wood which recycles, reclaims and repurposes wood and other antiques.  Scott Winroth of Winroth LLC a small basement operated 3D modeling and printing company was also there.  He’s was looking for space to bring his company to the next level and to network.

A representative from Duval Sign Company was also there discussing benefits that could be had for both the company and the makers alike.  They have a large format Laser (with a 52×100″ table!) , CNC router and offer painting and finishing services.    They discussed the importance of learning NC (numerical control) systems present in almost every industrial environment today.

Other makers were also represented with folks from the Steam Punk community, people who work with fiber, jewlery, glass and other arts.    There will be more to come on the Ayer makerspace planning and development.